POETRY_WORKBOOK


INTRODUCTION : About the games

Games do not simply provide an amusing introduction; they act as a focus, setting limits to assist concentration; they provide opportunities for discussion about the subject or form; and in some cases are directly instructive.


The games should be seen more as ideas, which can be given a form to suit circumstances. The game is only a vehicle that moves the player towards the poem.

It is important to realise that these games and the writing they lead to contain as many problems for adults (whose expectations are higher or more rigid) as for children, and are best presented as fun and recreation rather than taken over-seriously. After all, however people are encouraged to write, whatever the starting point, the real purpose is to develop pleasure and confidence in writing, the real game is the poem, which although often hard to play, is enjoyable and engrossing.


The workshop games cover a wide range and many can be played in different ways or to different ends; for ease of access I have arranged them in four groups:
  • Simple starts - games that encourage language play, agility with words.


  • Basic craft - games directed to one particular form or aspect of poetry writing, including rhythm, rhyme and figurative language.

  • Dialogue - inner and outer. Games directed to recall of incident and emotion, to the search for significant detail and precise description, to encouragement of the poet's own voice.

  • Invention - a wide range of theme-based games, not wholly fantasy or nonsense, to stimulate playful thinking and the ability to connect.

The games were devised over many games and workshops. largely to introduce skills or ways of thinking about writing that we, as writers, noticed were lacking and felt were necessary to assist in the making of poems.

For this reason the games are independant of each other, but a step- by-step programme would need
one or two SIMPLE STARTS,
most of the BASIC CRAFT,
and then at least How Do You See Yourself ?, Where We're At and
What Do You Think You're Doing from DIALOGUE
and several INVENTIONS .

worksheet image on off worksheet poems workbook pdf worksheets pdf
Windows Workshops Dave Calder, The Windows Project ,1997,1998,1999,2009